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Guyliath
Posted: August 25, 2008 10:23 pm
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hello all,
I am really after some advice on an interesting first true spider. i have kept lots of Ts before aswell as reptiles...etc. But I have never kept any true spiders. I would love to keep any of the really pretty wandering spiders, but I do not have a DWA, so any really attractive, easily kept recommendations?

Thanks for all your help in advance,

Guy
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fangeeta
Posted: June 18, 2009 02:33 pm
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get a huntsman spider, you can pick them up quite cheaply, their not really aggressive just very very skittish. if they do bite the would properly cause swelling and a rash nothing major. get one their cool.
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James Box
Posted: June 24, 2009 07:32 pm
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i have a few suggestions...

Thelcticopis modesta, an incredibly fuzzy orange huntsman from Malaysia. fast but not aggressive IME (actually surprisingly calm!). requires alot of humidity, heat and a tall container.

Ancylometes bogotensis, a South American fishing spider. the behaviour is amazing, it'll go under water to hide, and it traps air in its setae, making it look as if it's covered in chrome!
also, it dives for food in the water. very attractive, too...lovely reddish colouration with white and black markings.
care varies for this species from what i am told, but i kept mine in aquatic set ups with floating bits to rest on. seemed to work ok once i figured it out. i didn't use much heat.
they can move, but i've had no hint of them wanting to bite or do anything other than dive to safety under water.

Eresus albopictus, an Israeli "ladybird spider". we have one here in the UK called E niger (i think!), where the male has a red abdomen and black spots, hence the nickname, but this Israeli one has yellow colouration on the male. the female is a chunky black spider with tiny white speckles all over and noticeable dimples on the abdomen. it also has a yellow face, and white leg joints. very cute, and while reclusive, an easy spider to care for. IME quite slow moving.
this spider will either burrow or create a burrow with yellow webbing. you will usually only see its face, but last time i fed mine, she came out all the way, which was a treat!
they live roughly 5 years i am told...alot longer than some other True's, which i think are generally 18 month jobbies...though obviously that depends on the species.
care is dead easy...no water ever at all!!!! it'll kill them...most Eresidae are highly sensitive, including the social Stegodyphus species (i had no success with them, sadly, else i'd recommend them).
i personally haven't used an exceptional amount of heat with mine.

Scytodes aharonii, an Israeli spitting spider. we have S thoracica in the UK, which is similar but smaller. i caught one once, but stupidly put it in a tub with airholes alot bigger than i realised!
anyway, these are a spindly spider with a large, strangely domed cephalothorax. this species (and thoracica) have a leopard-like effect of a light yellowy tan base and brown spots. very cool and alien looking.
the best thing is how they hunt...they spit a venomous sticky glue at prey which subdues them surprisingly quickly...and then move in for the kill. you don't always see the strands of silk as they spit, but you see them move their head. it's fascinating!
i also have a tiny black species from Israel, but i rarely see it lol it's about big enough for microcrickets!
these appear to live a decent length of time...i've had one well over a year.
they are also a dry species, and i don't think i ever watered them.
also i haven't bothered with much extra heating for them.

Cupiennius salei...a Brazilian wandering spider. contrary to the common name, i found mine rarely wandered.
i got it last fall and it moulted once in my care. sadly i found it dead recently, which may have been age or might've been because i forgot to water, and i believe they are sensitive to dryness.
i was gutted, it was a beautiful spider, lovely stripes on its legs, orange on its face and underside. i would recommend them to anyone.
mine was fairly docile, not that i ever antagonised it, but unlike the DWA Phoneutria, which i am told is VERY defensive and skittish, my spider was quite calm, though a good feeder.
if you get one, don't do as i did, keep the moisture up! and perhaps a bit more heat would've been good to.

also, as Fangeeta says...you can't go wrong with huntsman in general, though they are very fast!

also i am not putting much info on bites as i don't know it...my basic advice is don't get bitten!!! it's actually rather easy to avoid, if you respect the animal.
if you get bitten even by a generally benign species, and it turns out you are sensitive, you not only risk your health and possibly life, you also may bring bad press down on our amazing hobby...and given the extant of irrational arachnophobia, we need all the good press we can get, and none of the bad.

hope you consider some of the ones i've mentioned, i doubt you'll be disappointed!


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Martin H.
Posted: July 19, 2009 05:54 pm
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Hi,

QUOTE (James Box @ June 24, 2009 07:32 pm)
i have a few suggestions...

Thelcticopis modesta, an incredibly fuzzy orange huntsman from Malaysia.

pet trade name for Heteropoda davidbowie sp. nov. see:
  • JÄGER, P. (2008): Revision of the huntsman spider genus Heteropoda Latreille 1804: species with exceptional male palpal conformations from Southeast Asia and Australia (Arachnida, Araneae, Sparassidae, Heteropodinae. Senckenbergiana biologica 88: 239-310.

all the best,
Martin


--------------------
»ARACHNE« – the journal for keepers of tarantulas and other arachnids
Deutsche Arachnologische Gesellschaft e.V.
British Tarantula Society
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Guyliath
Posted: August 14, 2009 10:41 am
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Hi all and thanks for all the replies, i have a german contact with
Heteropoda boiei
Heteropoda davidbowiei
Thelcticopis modesta
Cupiennius coccineus
so it is a bit of a toss up between them all, i have a bit of time though as i am having some glass vivs built for which ever species i go for.

he also has some very nice phoneutria boliviensis, but stupid english laws mean i have to spend three figures on a piece of paper that says i can keep them....grrr!

ah well.

thanks again guys
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ReneT
Posted: August 16, 2009 12:57 pm
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QUOTE (Guyliath @ August 25, 2008 10:23 pm)
hello all,
I am really after some advice on an interesting first true spider. i have kept lots of Ts before aswell as reptiles...etc. But I have never kept any true spiders. I would love to keep any of the really pretty wandering spiders, but I do not have a DWA, so any really attractive, easily kept recommendations?

Thanks for all your help in advance,

Guy

I can suggest jumping spiders (Salticidae). I started keeping Phidippus regius some months ago and they are my favourites at the moment. Very interesting behaviour and easy to keep.

This post has been edited by ReneT on August 16, 2009 12:58 pm


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