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Tommy Ang
Posted: July 15, 2007 02:43 pm
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Hello there! Here is a photo of a Malaysian Trapdoor Spider which I took recently. It is very closely related to tarantulas. And there is another photo which shows the actual trapdoor in a closed position. If it is touched, the spider will either open it ( to grab the prey ) or close it more tightly for protection.
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Chris Allen
Posted: July 15, 2007 02:55 pm
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Photos are what its about.
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very nice!now do these grow larger than L.malayanus?
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Dr. John
Posted: July 15, 2007 03:44 pm
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Hello Tommy ,

A very nice photo of a very nice spider . It's a real treat for the eye . What is her actual size ? The trapdoors seem to be very well camouflaged and hard to detect . The day I was up on the hill , I found at least a dozen tarantula burrows but not one trapdoor . I'm sure I just walked past several of them without noticing . Thanks for sharing your pics .

Dr. John
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Dr. John
Posted: July 15, 2007 04:00 pm
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Hi Chris ,

As far as I am informed , Liphistius desultor does not reach the size of Liphistius malayanus but is definitely more attractive in colouration , as you can see from the photo . I'm very lucky to have two specimens that were given to me as a present by a friend , in the country of origin .

Dr. John
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Yinnon Dolev
Posted: July 15, 2007 06:45 pm
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Very impressive Tommy - that is one species that I would love to get my hands on!

Their taxonomy is very interesting as they have a segmented abdomen and if I remember correctly (please fix me if I am not) they have abdominal spinnerets...

Over all, a very interesting species!

Are they readily available?


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andy hood
  Posted: July 15, 2007 07:45 pm
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wow what a stunning trapdoor spider indeed !! sdye.gif thum-up.gif
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Tommy Ang
Posted: July 16, 2007 01:21 am
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Good morning everybody!

The size of the specimen in the photo is 6cm ( legspan ) Dr John. And to Chris, the L. malayanus is a larger spider and Dr John is absolutely right about that. And to Yinnon Dolev, I do not think that this species is readily available.

Here is another photo of the trap which is very, very well camouflaged. The tendency is to miss it even if it is right in front of your eyes. Look for the tell-tale sensor threads that radiate out from the edge of the almost circular door.

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb49/ma...oor640Final.jpg
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Stuart Kirkland
Posted: October 15, 2007 05:10 am
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I thought it would be nice for this thread about the lovely L. Desultor to re-surface so here is one of the little trapdoor spiders found on a recent trip to Malaysia getting a new home.

Here she is, no pet name yet but I'm sure that The Wife will come up with something suitable:

user posted image

Here is the new home already prepared. This type of spider is typically found on a near-vertical slope so I have tried, as best as I can, to create a suitable environment. The soil has been firmly pressed into the container along about three quarters of the length and ends in a bit of a slope. There is a thin covering of soil at the end where I will place a water dish.

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Here she is poised on the slope of her new home:

user posted image

48 hours later and, despite very actively looking around her home, she still hasn't started on her burrow:

user posted image


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Alexandre Bonaccorso
Posted: October 15, 2007 03:32 pm
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Hi Stuart,

it's nice to go on with this subject based on wonderful wild pix of Tommy.
No advice to give you, but why not begin to dig the burrow ? I'd understand you'd rather see the spider do it itself thum-up.gif

Greetings,
Alex
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Chris Allen
Posted: October 15, 2007 06:36 pm
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Photos are what its about.
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great looking specimen Stuart!what i find interesting about these trap door spiders is that by detecting the vibrations from there trip lines they can somehow know wether whats walkin by is prey or a possible threat to them.its alot of fun feeding them.ashame u dont see them very often heh
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Tommy Ang
Posted: October 16, 2007 04:06 pm
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You're right, Chris. I've tried many tricks on them and they know it all the time. If a medium size cricket touches the trip lines, Wham! it's gone. A 3-inch gecko walking along the trip lines and the door is never opened. I tried poking it with my finger and it's never opened. In fact, it's pulled close more tightly until the door becomes slightly concave.

Warmest Regards,

Tommy

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Tommy Ang
Posted: October 24, 2007 11:43 am
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Here is a photo of a male L. desultor. It moulted recently.

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Greetings from Malaysia.

Tommy Ang
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